Thursday, October 4, 2012

Until March


Until March

Early spring. I watch
what cannot be seen
in a glance—the seeds
coming to life,
slowly pushing the soil
upward, outward, making
their presence known.

And I wondered why it is that life forms so far from brightness, deep within soil or womb. What fearful mystery does the dark protect? One of the tender plants, curling toward the light, gave me to know that darkness and chaos are not to be feared. It said, “Formlessness and void yield to Spirit—strength comes from weakness, light from darkness. Only when you have known darkness can life upspring.”

Late fall. The
tender plant, now
tall and strong, gives
food for my mouth,
the taste of light sweet
to the tongue.

And deep within the dark center are seeds. I take them in my hands: dried, stored until March, when once again they will take the plunge back into darkness, feel the Spirit,

and burst into light.


--submitted to dVerse. Trying out poetry that incorporates prose passages. 

24 comments:

  1. what fearful mystery does the dark protect....great question that...and why does life spring up where it does...that is one of the great mysteries...i like not fearing the dark and chaos...i agree with that completely...love the uplifting flourish toward the end as well...

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    1. Thanks Brian. The last two poems I wrote took a sad turn at the end, so I wanted something more uplifting.

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    1. Thanks for your kindness, Jenny.

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  3. I enjoy the balance here between poetry and prose. You make it seem the perfect, only way to describe this subject matter.

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  4. First, I laughed heartily at your purely accidental inclusion of thoughts you don't think about. Awesome. You transition from poetry to prose and back again very smoothly, exploring, testing, considering. Your insights are sagacious and the seed an effective conceit. There's a very appealing gentleness with which it's all presented, a calming atmosphere, that makes the growth at the end that much more warm and beautiful.

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    1. Thanks Anna. Your prompt was fun to work with--something new for me. I'm happy you felt comfortable here!

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  5. darkness and chaos are not to be feared ... love this wonderful poem! K

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    1. Kathleen, thanks for visiting and leaving such kind words.

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  6. nico, you writing is other-worldly, mysterious and soul deep.

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  7. Thanks Paige, I'm glad you thought so.

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  8. the seeds..the birthing...consuming...and then new life again...i like how you write that circle into words

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    1. The rhythms of life have much to teach a poet, I think. Thanks Claudia.

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  9. Dear Nico~
    What wondrous reverie you share here, as you seamlessly mate prose and poetry. The tale you tell is close to my heart. I am a gardener and from way back. The stream of consciousness prose is the perfect hook, reeling in the reader as partner in the planting.

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    1. Kim, thanks. I'm glad you were able to share in my gardening meditation.

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  10. I really like how this goes full circle with the seasons of life.

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  11. Thanks Laurie--the Web of Life is ever-fascinating.

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  12. this is a wonderful way to say that darkness isn't always as bad as we think.
    beautiful words shaped into a beautiful prose/poem.

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  13. Thanks Nephiriel. Yes, darkness is just part of the cycle--it doesn't last forever, we only have to wait until March . . .

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  14. This is incredible writing. Really enjoyed this.

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    1. That means a lot--thanks, MZ. I'm happy you liked it.

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  15. nico, i really enjoyed this poem, some really outstanding images in here. and the format really sets a sense of cycle. very well written, again enjoyed very much.

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    1. Thanks Wood--the images were strong in my mind, and I hoped I did them some justice on the virtual page. I'm truly glad you thought so.

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